Nigerian scams dating websites


24-Aug-2017 21:39

The man Rhonda Meade fell in love with promised to elope with her to a tropical island paradise where they could be married along white beaches as the setting sun shimmered across vast, crystal-clear waters.But, the only thing that ran away from the 36-year-old single mother’s life of hardship would eventually be all her savings and the security she had entrusted with “Walter.”Meade, whose name has been changed to protect her identity, was one of millions of people who flock to the Internet each year in search of romance and a long term relationship.But, while the person on the other end of your messaging app might seem legitimate, how can you tell?One of the longest running scams by mail and the Internet, the Nigerian '419' scam (named after the section of the Nigerian code dealing with financial fraud schemes), alleges a wealthy business owner or government official needs help transferring millions of dollars out of his country in exchange for a percentage of the funds for your help.

“I thought he was too good to be true.”Chatting nightly over Yahoo! It had been over two years since the death of her husband of 20 years; four, since she had lost her mother.She filled out a questionnaire and carefully crafted her profile.“You never think you can become a victim until it happens to you,” Meade said.

“But, with as many people as there are online, the Internet is ripe with people these scam men can sucker into their scheme.”Each year, thousands of men and women use the online chat forums and messaging apps to meet potential dates and perhaps, potential spouses.She resolved to be pickier, only contacting men who were closely matched — 90 percent or more, as determined by the algorithm pulling the strings behind her online search. Back in college, she'd studied computer science and psychology, and she considered herself pretty tech-savvy.